I’m a CPAP User; How Often Do I Need a New Sleep Study?

We’re asked this question on a daily basis.

Usually, it’s one of the following reasons:

1. You’re a CPAP user and would like a new machine. 

If your CPAP machine is more than a few years old, you may be interested in a new machine. Most insurances will cover a new CPAP every 3 to 5 years (learn more here).

In recent years, machines have become smaller, quieter and most now have wireless compliance monitoring so you can keep track of your progress (and no longer have to mail in your smart card if you need a compliance report).

In this case, your insurance company may require a new sleep study to show that you still have sleep apnea. If this is the case, you may be able to get by with only a home sleep test to confirm your diagnosis (learn more about HST here).

If, like many CPAP users, you dread the though of a night without your CPAP (you can’t use HST equipment and CPAP at the same time), you may prefer to go to the sleep center for a 50/50 or split night study (learn more about different sleep study types here).

2. You’ve gained or lost weight

If you’ve had a significant change in your weight since starting CPAP therapy, you may benefit from a different treating pressure. Going into the sleep center for a titration study will allow you to have a full night’s sleep while the technician adjusts your PAP pressure up or down to find one that eliminates all or most events.

Some people using CPAP therapy find that they lose weight immediately after starting therapy due to increased energy levels from getting more sleep. Read more about how CPAP can effect weight loss here.

3. You suspect you need a pressure change

If you’re a seasoned CPAP user, you can probably tell when your pressure requirements change. If you’re using a CPAP (not an autoPAP which automatically adjusts the pressure throughout the night, learn more about that here) and would like to change the pressure, you will need a new sleep study to determine the new pressure. 

4. You want to try bilevel PAP therapy

If you are using CPAP at a high pressure or suspect that you may benefit from bilevel therapy, most insurance companies will require that you demonstrate CPAP intolerance during an overnight sleep study.

Typically, you will arrive for a full night titration study and will start with CPAP therapy until a high pressure is reached or if you become uncomfortable with the CPAP pressure. Read more about insurance coverage for bilevel PAP therapy here.

5. You’re still experiencing symptoms even though you’re using CPAP

If you’re still feeling very sleepy during the day even though you’re using CPAP therapy, you may not have a good treating pressure or may be suffering from another sleep disorder (learn more about different types of sleep disorders here).

In some cases, an additional sleep study to evaluate your pressure needs should be discussed with your physician. Alternatively, you could request a consultation with a sleep specialist (we can help facilitate consultations in Southern California here).

Are you a current CPAP user in need of a sleep study for one of these reasons? If so, contact us today to schedule your appointment!

Request a sleep study

Other posts you may find interesting:

Comments

  1. Dorothy Morton Reply

    I have been using cpap for over 5 years. I had a sleep study two years ago and my report last week shows “average AHI at 1.9”. I was told that is the number of events down from 41 before cpap. My Dr is asking for another sleep study. I question whether that is necessary. I would like your opinion

Leave a Comment