4 Reasons Why You Should Wear Blue Light Blocking Glasses TONIGHT

I have good news for you. Musicians aren’t the only people who can look cool wearing tinted glasses … inside … at night. 

According to research, exposure to artificial light at night can disrupt our sleep. Blue wavelength light, the kind that comes from TVs, iPads, and smartphones, is especially harmful to circadian rhythm function. 

So, what are we do to about this? In this blog post, we explain the top reasons why you should consider wearing a pair of these dashing glasses tonight.

1. Light, in general, keeps you up at night 

Many people, even those without a diagnosed sleep disorder such as circadian rhythm disorder, are sensitive to evening light (learn about different types of sleep disorders here). People diagnosed with this disorder are unable to sleep and wake at the times required for normal work, school and social needs. Shift workers are at high risk for circadian rhythm disruptions, because of their non-traditional schedules. This is called shift-work disorder and can lead to car accidents and other terrible consequences (learn more about shift work disorder here).  

All animals and even plants, have natural biological circadian rhythms which are controlled by our biological clocks and work on a daily time scale (wake up when the sun rises, sleep when the sun sets). Exposure to artificial light after the sun has set can fool the body into thinking it’s playtime, not sleepy time. 

Blue light blocking glasses block a significant amount of light generally, not just blue light, which can help our bodies ease into sleepy time. This general dimness, which can also be achieved by turning down the lights and brightness on electronics, may reduce the amount of time it takes for you to fall asleep at night. 

 

2. The blue light from TVs & screens suppresses melatonin production, making it harder to sleep at night.

Blue light is particularly harmful to our sleep. This wavelength suppresses melatonin (the hormone that helps to regulate our circadian rhythm) more vigorously than other wavelengths. Many of the new energy efficient light sources (like those light bulbs you’re supposed to buy) including our favorite electronic devices (smartphones, tablets, TVs), produce high concentrations of this light.

Harvard researchers and their colleagues conducted an experiment comparing the effects of 6.5 hours of exposure to blue light to exposure to green light of comparable brightness. The blue light suppressed melatonin for about twice as long as the green light and shifted circadian rhythms by twice as much (3 hours vs. 1.5 hours).

Scientists at China’s Sichuan University studied the effects of blue-light blocking artificial lenses implanted during cataract surgery. They found improvements in the quality and length of sleep as well as reduced daytime dysfunction due to sleepiness.

Brown or yellow tinted glasses may reduce light transmittance also, but do not block as much light in the blue wavelength range as orange glasses.

 

3. You know you should stop using electronic devices before bed, but is that really ever going to happen??

We’ve all heard that you should keep electronic devices, like smartphones, out of the bedroom (read more on why here and tips for making it happen here). I know it’s hard. And when are you going to catch up on Homeland and Game of Thrones if you can’t watch TV before bed? For those of use who can’t give up night-time electronics, these glasses can help.

Blue light blocking glasses used in a study of teen aged boys, showed an increase of melatonin levels, even when electronics usage remained the same. 

 

4. Be like Bono.

Bono admitted during an interview on BBC’s The Graham Norton Show, that he has glaucoma. He has been quoted previously as saying that he is sensitive to light. Now that you’ve read this entire blog post, you know that EVERYONE is sensitive to light. So you should wear tinted glasses all the time too, just like Bono.

 

Are you concerned that you or a loved one is excessively sleepy during the day and may need a sleep study? Learn more about sleep studies here.

Request sleep study

 

Sources:

http://www.aasmnet.org/jcsm/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=29067
http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side 

Other posts you may find interesting:

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in October 2014 and has been edited and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Photo Credit: Oprah.com

Comments previously posted on Sleepdr.com/blog:

Anderson

1/14/2015, 8:00:58 PM

I purchased T’aime blue light blocking glaases. Very good quality, super light frame, no more headache in the evening even after 10 hours of computer, what else should I ask for! Highly recommended!

I’m a software engineer so I don’t like to write too much 😉

Attached also a pic of me + glasses.

1/15/2015, 8:44:56 AM

Anderson, do you wear the glasses during the day while working or just in the evening? Thanks for sharing!

Anderson

1/15/2015, 10:44:18 PM

Hi Julia, I wear the glasses during working all day long. In the evening, I don’t use them. But I try my best to reduce the time on my iPhone and tablets before bedtime. One more tip, if you use PS in work, better not to purchase one since the glasses will change a little color on your screen.

1/16/2015, 8:47:57 AM

You have some great blue-light-blocking habits! I was going to ask about that: how noticeable is the tinting on the glasses? Does it interfere with your work at all or do you find it negligible? Thanks!

Anderson

1/18/2015, 7:31:41 PM

I have no bad feelings when working. I sometimes drive with them. Yes, I think the interference you mean is about the clarity. There is no interference with the clarity when I’m coding. I often wear them in the office all day long. As for the tinting, no more worries. Since I couldn’t unload my pic, you can check here: http://www.taimeopt.com/product/dinodon/. I got the black one. Sorry, I don’t know how to describe more specifically.

1/20/2015, 2:21:40 PM

There really is no downside to using glasses like these, and the upside is so significant–a good night’s sleep. We hope that more people can get used to using blue-light-blocking glasses, at least at night, or even during the day if they use electronics frequently like you do. Thanks for the link!

Samit Patel

2/24/2015, 2:59:50 AM

Hi Guys, there is another solution which i have been using. You don’t have to wear big glasses, it is a screen protector which blocks blue light. It is created by eye care professionals so your in good hands. I have been using the product for the last month and can notice the differences. Check out ocushield.com

2/24/2015, 9:25:10 AM

Great to hear there is another option that targets the source of blue light directly! People looking to improve their circadian rhythms can use whichever option they find more convenient or comfortable. Does the filter change the way your screen looks?

7/30/2015, 3:39:38 PM

This is a great article. I keep hearing more about blue blocking glasses — will have to give it a try.

Definitely avoiding screens for an hour before bedtime is a quick way to improve sleep. Thanks for sharing on our FB page as well. 🙂

7/31/2015, 7:59:46 AM

It’s definitely a good habit, but one that a lot of us struggle with! It’s hard to avoid phones, computers, etc before bed when we’re constantly surrounded by electronics. Using goggles is a good option when you can’t avoid looking at a screen.

3/6/2016, 6:44:08 AM

They sell blue light blocking glasses that look like normal glasses, it’s not orange. I dont have migraine anymore.You should have a look http://www.thefreeglasses.com i guess.
About this article, i found it interesting. You should give us more details.

Comments

  1. Lunette Vintage Reply

    Can I wear the glasses during the day or during driving ?? Thanks

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